Bush Administration changes official position on legitimacy of Qur’an desecration allegations

Bush Administration changes official position on legitimacy of Qur’an desecration allegations

June 4, 2005

 

 

 

The cover of the Qur’an

 

After an investigaThe cover of the Qur'antion of allegations that Islam’s holy book the Qu’ran was mishandled in front of inmates at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Bush administration has acknowleged the credibility of some of these reports. According to Robert Burns of the Associated Press, U.S. military officials acknowledged that, “a Muslim holy book was splashed with urine,” and “a detainee’s Quran was deliberately kicked and another’s was stepped on.” The US government first denied a specific report that the Qu’ran had been flushed down a toilet at the prison facility, but on Friday agreed that similar allegations were indeed true.

 

 

 

On May 16, Newsweek magazine apologized to the victims of deadly riots that ensued due to a Newsweek article stating that U.S. officials defiled the Qur’an. White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan criticized Newsweek’s initial response to the incident, saying it was “puzzling.” Later that day, Newsweek retracted the story, which the White House said was a “good first step”.Irene Khan, Secretary General, Amnesty International Continue reading “Bush Administration changes official position on legitimacy of Qur’an desecration allegations”

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Sunni Shi’te Divide Grows

Iraqi PM fires senior Sunni Arab official

Wed 21 Feb 2007 9:30 AM ET

(Adds statement from Sunni Endowment)

BAGHDAD, Feb 21 (Reuters) – The head of a state body that runs Iraq’s Sunni Muslim religious sites said on Wednesday he was fired for criticising the government, including its handling of charges by a Sunni woman that she was raped by police.

The government of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, a Shi’ite Islamist, said Ahmed Abdul Ghafour al-Samarrai would be replaced as the head of the Sunni Endowment, a public institution similar to a ministry which manages Sunni mosques and other sites.

Samarrai said by telephone from Jordan that he believed he was fired because of his frequent criticism of the government.

“I think it is because I’m always rejecting most of the decisions made by this government,” he said. Continue reading “Sunni Shi’te Divide Grows”

STATISTICS OF ANTI-MUSLIM VIOLENCE IN INDIA

Source: Indian Muslim Relief Committee of ISNA

Copyright ©, All Rights Reserved.


 

Data for 1954 – 1985 are taken from the records of the Home Ministry of India. Later data are compiled by the California based India Research Center.
Muslim organizations, national media, and several human rights organizations have always disputed official figures. They say the number of persons killed in these riots is much higher than the figures reported by the government.


 

Year Incidents Killed Injured
1954 84 34 512
1955 75 24 457
1956 82 82 575
1957 58 12 316
1958 40 7 369
1959 42 41 1,344
1960 26 14 262
1961 92 108 593
1962 60 43 348
1963 61 26 489
1964 1,070 1,919 2,053
1965 173 173 758
1966 144 45 467
1967 198 25 880 Continue reading “STATISTICS OF ANTI-MUSLIM VIOLENCE IN INDIA”

Hindutva & Ayodhya

Babri Masjid It is twelve years since the Hindutva fanatics demolished the Babri Masjid in Ayodhya. Perhaps no other day in independent India’s history signifies and symbolizes the communal polarization, mutual hatred, and a contempt for rule of law, so blatant in our society today, as that black Sunday in December 92. We saw Golwalkar in action, “teaching” Indian Muslims how they should lead their lives in India as “second rate” citizens — citizens without any rights. Though I had known it very well that these fanatics could stoop to any low to gain political mileage, I hadn’t thought till that day, in fact till the All India Radio confirmed the demolition in its evening news, that the struture would actually be grounded. I had the rather simplistic impression that the “karsevaks” would enter the disputed site, with the help of the friendly police, and might even damage the masjid a little bit, but wouldn’t dare to do the total demolition. As a not so politically conscious teenager, this perhaps was understandable. Unfortunately the then prime minister Narasimha Rao, it appears now, was just as naive, willing to trust an Advani and a Kalyan Singh on their word that the Masjid wouldn’t be demolished. In the days followed, people were behaving in pretty strange — or was that more natural then? — ways. I could see many friends of mine from the Muslim community keeping a distance from me and other non-Muslims. The behaviour of several of my Hindu friends was even more strange. Many were ecstatic about the destruction that took place in Ayodhya — several ordinary Hindu teenagers parrotted local RSS hooligans, for a short period though. When our college reopened after a fortnight of bandhs, hartals, strikes, and a general everything-isn’t-alright atmosphere, my closest friend confessed to me that though he couldn’t justify Gandhi’s assassination — many on the “secular” side were talking a lot about the parallels between the Masjid demolition and Gandhi’s assassination — he sympathized with Godse’s position. As one can see, talking in extremes was the norm. This was the period when I started taking a keener interest in political matters. Though never very active in day-to-day activism, I decided to pay more attention to what such local activists say. I found that those who actually work with people and their problems weren’t floundering at difficult times, unlike some of the bookish liberal intellectuals. In societal matters, words of those who are willing to make sacrifices, started appealing to me more, than the dull rigour of “academic” logic. Back to Babri Masjid, for a “secularist”, today it is politically correct to say that the issue should be settled in court. On the whole, our judiciary is exemplary, and I believe this issue can be settled in court. But I think a truly secular government should be willing to undo the wrong, and the right thing to do is to rebuild the masjid there. If I advocate anything less than this, I can’t but feel that I’m indirectly siding with the demolishers.

Black day of so called Indian Secularism

(Babri Masjid and associated complex were totally destroyed on December 6, 1992.)

“Every civil building connected with Mahommedan tradition should be levelled to the ground without regard to antiquarian veneration or artistic predilection.” British Prime Minister Palmerston’s Letter No. 9 dated 9 October 1857, to Lord Canning, Viceroy of India, Canning Papers.

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‘One group of karsevaks blocked all entry points into Ayodhya to keep out central security forces, while another began to loot and burn Muslim homes’

Did the leaders know beforehand what was going to happen that afternoon? There can be no final answer to that question. Perhaps some did, others did not. Certainly one answer seems to emerge from our narrative, another from the likes of editor Chandan Mitra. Not that the leadership of the parivar comes off any better from Mitra’s graphic description of their behaviour during that crucial period when the attack on the mosque was mounted — the giggling political sanyasins, Uma Bharati and Ritambhara; Joshi overcome by the size of the mammoth crowd; Singhal, convinced that the karseva would go along expected lines and giving precise orders, to a crowd that could not care less, about how to wipe and clean the site of the projected temple; the moment of reckoning when the crowd goes berserk on seeing two karsevaks on the top of the domes of the mosque while the high command sat, ‘tense’, ‘sombre-faced’, ‘hopelessly sullen’, with faces like ‘grim death’; the lament of Rajendra Singh, the de facto supremo of the RSS, ‘the ministry is gone’; and finally the pathetic and belated attempts to calm down the crowd by the leaders taking turn in appealing to the karsevaks, while others like Acharya Dharmendra tried to interest an uninterested crowd in a bhajan. Continue reading “Black day of so called Indian Secularism”

Cost of War

Number Of Iraqi Civilians Slaughtered In America’s Rape Of Iraq –  At Least 655,000 + +


Number of U.S. Military Personnel Sacrificed (Officially acknowledged) In America’s Rape Of Iraq 3,018


Cost of America’s War in Iraq

$357,730,483,761 till the seond this was posted

In April, 2003 an intergenerational team of Niko Matsakis of Boston, MA and Elias Vlanton of Takoma Park, MD created costofwar.com. After maintaining it on their own for the first year, they gave it to the National Priorities Project to contribute to their ongoing educational efforts.

http://nationalpriorities.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=182